David Coveney

David Coveney
Dave has been working in software development since 1988, starting with payroll development and then ERP consultancy for large corporates. He is a keen traveller, photographer and motorsport enthusiast, but now puts family first as he’s massively in love with his two little boys. Dave is still an early adopter. He was connected to the internet from his bedroom, way back in the eighties, had a personal website by 1994, was into the connected house in the late '90s, a smartphone by 2002, and a was the first in the office with a fitness tracker.

It’s quite apt that on the day that WordPress.com appears to have broken (it’s not serving any front-end pages on this blog at the time of writing if you’re logged in) I’m making a post about hosting.

I was working with a client recently on their own, customised installation of WordPress… and it was driving me potty. The lesson: Keep it standard. It makes life easier for all involved.

There are some nice tricks inside WordPress, for example this WordPress Auto 301 Feature. Keep up the good work ladies and gentlemen!

Sometimes there’s a need to produce training videos which show how you carry out a certain piece of work. Simply explaining a technique isn’t always possible in words.

I was reading through some project management methodology just now (yay! My life is full of joy at last!) and came across the phrase “The Wicked Problem”.

One thing worth thinking about in 2008, is fixing the DNS entry to your website. Most are probably set up just fine, but here’s one of the most common problems we see.

Two hot topics, in one post. WordPress is the hot blogging tool right now, and the iPhone is one of the hot mobile phones! Here I talk about posting to WordPress from the iPhone.

We’ve been writing custom themes for clients for quite some time now, and felt it was time to give something back to the WordPress community. So we built a GPL theme for hosted versions of WordPress.

So we’re hoping to be one of the first to congratulate WordPress on hitting the two million blogs mark. To us it’s big news – we’ve made a strategic decision to be increasingly involved in WordPress.

Take a look at the effect of Google ranking on the number of pageviews on this personal blog. Quite a jump, you can see!

Create an “.htaccess” file in the folder you want to be cached and add the following to it. This will have the effect of caching your site for a week.

Expensive mistakes can be avoided by just being a little bit careful. Imagine you’d spent many thousands on this marketing campaign, only to get it plastered around the web… for the wrong reasons.